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June 2024
Preview Issue
Make It Yours. Make It Lokar. Modern Performance. Classic Style. Endless Options.
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selection of steering wheels
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Series Restored by Lokar
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selection of driving pedals
Series Restored by Lokar
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InTheGarageMedia.com
blue '82 Chevy Squarebody C1500 driving on the road
yellow truck with palm trees and a sunset in the background
blue ’82 Chevy Squarebody C1500 truck driving on the road
yellow truck with palm trees and a sunset in the background
man wearing mask and safety goggles working on a '64 C10
side view of a white ’59 Chevy Apache with red detailing
frame of ’66 GMC
3/4 view of a red ’53 Ford F-100
Hot Rod
CLASSIC TRUCK PERFORMANCE VOLUME 5 • ISSUE 46 • 2024
CTP June 2024 cover
On The Cover:
To celebrate our fourth anniversary, NotStock Photography snapped the stunning, Korek-built Strobel F-1 for our June ’24 cover … see the rest of the feature on page 12.
Classic Truck Performance ISSN 2692-2347 (print) ISSN 2692-2355 (online) Issue 46 is published monthly by In the Garage Media, Inc., 370 E. Orangethorpe Avenue, Placentia, CA 92870-6502. Application to mail at periodicals prices is pending at Placentia, CA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Classic Truck Performance c/o In the Garage Media, Inc., 1350 E. Chapman Ave #6550, Fullerton, CA 92834-6550 or email ITGM, Inc. at subscription@inthegaragemedia.com. Copyright (c) 2024 IN THE GARAGE MEDIA, INC. Printed in the USA. The Classic Truck Performance trademark is a registered trademark of In The Garage Media, Inc.
The Best in Performance
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CPP
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*Prices subject to change without notice, please inquire. Also, please note that kits and prices may vary between certain applications.
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BRIAN BRENNAN
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ROB FORTIER
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Wes Allison, Rodney Bauman, Tommy Lee Byrd, Ron Ceridono, Michael Christensen, Ron Covell, Grant Cox, Dominic Damato, John Drummond, Fuelish Media, Eric Geisert, John Gilbert, Joe Greeves, Barry Kluczyk, Scotty Lachenauer, Don Lindfors, Ryan Manson, Josh Mishler, NotStock Photography, Todd Ryden, Jason Scudellari, Chris Shelton, Tim Sutton, Chuck Vranas, Michael Yamada – Writers and Photographers
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Multiple cover issues from Classic Truck Performance
CTP logo Still Hammerin’

InTheGarageMedia.com

Rob Fortier
BY ROB FORTIER
Four Down …
T

his very issue you’re holding in your hands—or reading electronically via some intelligent gadget—marks the fourth anniversary of Classic Truck Performance/In The Garage Media … FOUR YEARS! But to be quite honest, I’m not the least bit surprised we’ve not only made it this far (in these strange times we’re in) but have grown substantially since our launching at the dawn of the pandemic. 

Why the confidence? Well, simply put, when we all (the collective ITGM family) left our previous place of employ, there was a huge void left in the way of niche market enthusiast magazines. And, as we’re all just that, enthusiasts, we felt responsible for filling that hole with the best, non-corporate publications we could possibly make. And that’s precisely what we’ve spent the last four years doing. 

It hasn’t been easy by any means, but the rewards of seeing your hard work on the newsstands, on people’s phones/tablets, and so on, is beyond worth it. And that hard work goes beyond our very small ITGM family (Yasmin Fajatin and Sarah Gonzales running an extremely tight ship, Rob Munoz busting out one amazing layout/cover after another, Nick Licata doing his thing quite successfully with All Chevy Performance, and Modern Rodding’s Brian Brennan and Group Publisher Tim Foss taking our company to the next level, on all levels!), as we have a network of freelancers filling the pages (of all three titles) on a monthly basis.  Without every single one of them, none of this would’ve been possible, nor would it continue to be the successful venture that it is.

CTP  Parts Dept.

InTheGarageMedia.com
1. Speedhut’s All-New SpeedBox; 2. Boese Engineering Early Chevy Truck Gauge Panels; 3. Classic Industries Ford F-100 Replacement<br />
Cowl Panels
1. Speedhut’s All-New SpeedBox

The Speedhut SpeedBox is the ultimate solution for effortlessly upgrading your cable-driven mechanical speedometer. Supporting GPS and modern transmission signals, it’s the simplest and most versatile speedometer conversion for any vehicle. Requiring only 12 V and ground, it’s a hassle-free plug-and-play solution that eliminates the need for tedious calibration or subscription services. With a Drive Output Thread of 7/8-18 and a Square of 0.112 inch, the SpeedBox offers flexibility and its calibration range from 170-1,650 turns per mile ensures precision for diverse speedometers. With its versatile design, the box can be efficiently installed either in the dashboard or underhood. Default calibrated for U.S. speedometers at 1,000 turns per mile, it adapts effortlessly to signals from GPS or VSS (Vehicle Speed Sensor), automatically calibrating with the included GPS antenna.

(Special offer: Use the promo code SPEEDBOX10 and get 10 percent off while the offer lasts!)

For more info, contact Speedhut at (801) 221-1460 or visit speedhut.com.

2. Boese Engineering Early Chevy Truck Gauge Panels

Boese Engineering releases its ’35-39 Chevy Truck and ’35-36 Chevy Master gauge panels. The panels are designed for 3-3/8- and 3-1/8-inch Auto Meter (or similar) gauges and are made out of 6061 aluminum. Available in multiple colors, including brushed, brushed with black anodized, or polished finish.

For more info, contact Boese Engineering at (877) 263-7377 or visit boeseengineering.com.

3. Classic Industries Ford F-100 Replacement Cowl Panels

Classic Industries just unveiled the new OER authorized reproduction cowl panel assembly with inner bracing for ’53-56 Ford F-Series trucks. This assembly extends from the bottom of the cab to the upper door hinge. Unlike a skin, this assembly includes the outer skin, the inner bracing, and the door hinge area, as well as a partial A-pillar bottom post. The assembly comes welded together as a single unit for a more complete replacement when an outer skin will not do. It is manufactured from high-grade sheetmetal and features all the correct contours and bends, ensuring a proper fit and a permanent repair. After many years of use, and decades of exposure to the elements, the original panels can be damaged or corroded beyond what a patch can repair. Made from high-quality materials, the repair panel assemblies are sold individually.

For more info, contact Classic Industries at (800) 854-1280 or visit classicindustries.com.

Feature
InTheGarageMedia.com
Gertrude, Revisited title
Saun & Dennis Strobel’s Korek Designs–Built ’50 Ford F-1
BY CTP StaffIMAGES BY NotStock Photography
D

ennis Strobel has been a lifelong enthusiast of hot rod and custom vehicles. In 2009, on the way to a vacation with his wife, Saun, in Holmes County, Ohio, they happened upon and attended a Goodguys event in Norwalk, Ohio, where they saw a stunning ’41 Ford hot rod pickup pull into the show. Dennis has always been a fan of the ’40-41 Ford pickups and wanted to meet the owners of that particular truck. From that point on, the search for a classic ’40-41 Ford pickup began.

a red and a blue ’50 Ford F-1
CTP Tech
InTheGarageMedia.com
Carson Reed’s ’64 Chevy, Part 1: The Beginning
By Rob Fortier & Carson Reed
Images by Carson Reed
O

ver the last three-plus decades I’ve met some amazing builders—many of whom have become close friends. One such individual is Ryan Reed (Reed’s Ride Designs), who I originally crossed paths with when I was thrown head-first into the world of Fat Jack Robinson back in the ’90s. Since then, we’ve both grown into fine, upstanding adults(!) and both have managed to raise equally admirable sons. Ryan’s boy, Carson, now a freshman in high school, is quickly following in his father’s footsteps—learning the ins and outs of building hot rods the right way: with as much attention to detail as humanly possible combined with top-notch craftsmanship. His first hands-on project, fittingly enough, is his own set of wheels … his very first set he’ll be driving to school once he obtains his learner’s permit (and Pop’s permission!).

High School Hauler title; Ryan Reed sitting in a truck passenger seat
Ryan Reed sitting in a truck passenger seat
High School Hauler title
Carson Reed’s ’64 Chevy, Part 1: The Beginning
By Rob Fortier & Carson Reed
Images by Carson Reed
O

ver the last three-plus decades I’ve met some amazing builders—many of whom have become close friends. One such individual is Ryan Reed (Reed’s Ride Designs), who I originally crossed paths with when I was thrown head-first into the world of Fat Jack Robinson back in the ’90s. Since then, we’ve both grown into fine, upstanding adults(!) and both have managed to raise equally admirable sons. Ryan’s boy, Carson, now a freshman in high school, is quickly following in his father’s footsteps—learning the ins and outs of building hot rods the right way: with as much attention to detail as humanly possible combined with top-notch craftsmanship. His first hands-on project, fittingly enough, is his own set of wheels … his very first set he’ll be driving to school once he obtains his learner’s permit (and Pop’s permission!).

CTP Event
InTheGarageMedia.com
passenger side quarter view of a vibrant blue classic truck
71st white stencil typography
Detroit Autorama bold red stencil typography
Pickups are Popular in the Motor City
By Eric GeisertImages by the Author
O

ne of the best things about indoor car shows held in the winter is you can indulge in your favorite pastime even if there are 3-foot snowdrifts outside. Though that has been known to happen in Detroit, the weather at this year’s 71st Meguiar’s Detroit Autorama was about as perfect as you’d want it, and tens of thousands of people descended into Huntington Place (the old Cobo Hall) in the city’s downtown for three days of automotive glory.

Last year saw two pickups receive Great 8 awards and compete for the show’s nationally recognized top honor (the Don Ridler Memorial Award), but while this year no truck owner or builder got that close, there were plenty of other haulers of all shapes, sizes, stances, and styles on hand to satisfy every truck owner’s tastes.

Feature

InTheGarageMedia.com

The Alternative Fix typography
Troy Alston’s ’59 Chevy Apache

By Rob FortierImages by Jason Matthew

W

hen asked how he got involved in the hobby, New Jersey’s Troy Alston simply replied, “I was tired of crashing my motorcycle!” Fair enough! Once that life-saving decision was made, Troy located his first truck project: a ’55 Chevy 3100 he came across for sale on the interwebs. Seemed like everything was moving steadily in the right direction … or so he thought.

CTP Tech
InTheGarageMedia.com
three men working on a red engine
Chris Cerce Customs
Adding Supercar Handling to a ’66 GMC
BY Chuck VranasIMAGES BY THE AUTHOR
T

here’s nothing better than staying in tune with regional shops across the country for Classic Truck Performance. Frequent visits to many of them gives us the opportunity to follow new builds as they move forward from their basic starting points while focusing on the progression of design elements fused with plenty of custom fabrication and industry-leading parts. Our latest stop brought us back to Chris Cerce Customs (CCC) in Taunton, Massachusetts, to check out the current projects laid out across the shop being worked on, including one particular ’66 GMC pickup receiving the full custom treatment to prepare it for a fresh start this year.

Entering the massive 9,500-square-foot shop you’re immediately consumed by the final assembly area filled with a number of projects moving toward completion. With CCC handling everything from the initial concept embodying a truly contemporary flair perfectly blended with cutting-edge performance from an updated platform and hopped-up LS driveline, the evolution of the GMC promises to be another noteworthy build to roll out of the shop. Shadowed by Layla, the ultimate shop dog, we wasted no time in getting up close and personal with the freshly minted chassis to delve into just what makes it so wicked.

CTP logoFeature star Feature

InTheGarageMedia.com

Tangerine Dream
Joe Smith’s Alluring LS-Powered ’53 Ford F-100
BY Chuck VranasImages BY THE AUTHOR
O

ne of the easiest ways for truck enthusiasts to channel their passions while growing up was to visit their local hobby shop while digging into the endless stacks of plastic kit models to spend a Saturday at the kitchen table building their favorite haulers. Regardless of whether you leaned toward bone-stockers or hot hop-ups laced with custom parts there was something for everyone, showcased by kits from Monogram, AMT, Revell, and Aurora, to name but a few. For a young Joe Smith, of Plymouth, Massachusetts, there were plenty of models built, fueling a fire lasting for decades, leading him to the decadent ’53 Ford F-100 laid out across our pages.

CTP Tech
InTheGarageMedia.com
yellow '68 C10 truck in the snow
1. This is the moment when we first laid eyes on our ’68 C10 project. The truck had been slowly decaying next to this barn for years, but we couldn’t help falling in love anyway.
The Speedway Motors '68 C10 Build
Part 1: How It All Began
BY Joe McCollough
IMAGES BY Andy Chaves & Jessica Coleman
H

ere at Speedway Motors, we love working on our in-house projects. It’s a great chance for us to put our parts to the test and develop new products to help our customers tackle similar projects. When we decided to build a C10, we wanted to start with something that would showcase the huge variety of truck parts that we offer and inspire us to create some new ones. In other words, we were looking for a truck that needed just about everything. Our goal was to find a C10 that needed to be saved, then hit the Speedway Motors shelves for the parts we would need to transform it from humble beginnings and make it into a fun driver.

What we ended up with was certainly humble. Our search turned up a ’68 C10 shortbox that was rough, rusty, and had been slowly decaying next to a South Dakota barn for who knows how long. The box, engine, transmission, and most of the interior had flown the coop ages ago. But it was a real shortbox and had that cool ’67-68 front sheetmetal that we were looking for. We fell in love at first sight with what many would consider to be a lost cause. You know how that goes.
Feature
InTheGarageMedia.com
Super Squarebody!
Not All Heroes Wear Capes
by FUELISH MEDIA
T

here’s nothing mild mannered about this ’82 Chevy pickup. Cory Shows, of Caledonia, Mississippi, works as a custom aircraft painter by trade, and loves every minute he has spent customizing trucks over the last 20 years. When the time came to further push the new Squarebody he’d just purchased, he found himself instantly struck by a heroic bolt of inspiration.

CTP Tech
InTheGarageMedia.com
rear view of a raised silver pickup truck
1. With an overabundance of ugly, it’s hard to make a mid-’50s International pickup look anything but odd, but the crew at Old Anvil Speed Shop certainly proved that theory wrong while working on this ’63 International Harvester C1100 and, in the process of creating a swan from an ugly duckling, turned their attention to fabricating a perfectly proportional tailgate.
Scratch Building a Double-Wall Tailgate
Old Anvil Redesigns an International Harvester C1100 Backside
Last month we showed you how Scott’s Hotrods ’N Customs fabricated a “fully custom” ’47-53 Chevy tailgate (including the mechanicals) … this month, we give you more “hindsight” on aesthetically reskinning a ’63 International gate with Old Anvil! —Editor
BY ERIC GEISERTIMAGES BY THE AUTHOR
I

n previous stories featured in this magazine we’ve witnessed how Old Anvil Speed Shop in Orange, California, was able to work some of their magic on (by all accounts) an ugly ’63 International Harvester C1100 with the midsize bed (International Harvester made three lengths: a long-box type, midsize, and a shortbed version—commonly seen in the Gasser era).

The truck’s factory design wasn’t meant to be anything other than just functional, and the factory must not have had a high level of quality control back in the day because Old Anvil has noticed on multiple International Harvester trucks the same doorjamb rub or different dimensions from the right side to the left side of the vehicle.

Old Anvil began by first chopping and reshaping the roofline, stretching the doors, fabbing new A-posts, and making some major improvements to the rear fenders that allowed Old Anvil to reproportion the factory “large forehead” appearance and bring the whole project into the 21st century while keeping some of the ’60s-era look.

Feature

InTheGarageMedia.com
legacy series
The Dale Hollenbeck Chevy Stepside
BY ROB FORTIERImages BY Tim Sutton
CTP‘s

Legacy Series is devoted to preserving the history of the hobby, be it legends who paved the way for us today or the trucks that have persevered and/or have been preserved for us to appreciate today … it’s all about the history! This month we pay homage to our close friend Darryl Hollenbeck’s late father Dale’s OG work truck: his ’74 Stepside Squarebody.

What's Inside Your Ride typography
TMI logo
Visit us at TMIproducts.com typography
red truck driving and two black leather seats
close up of black and brother leather seats
close up of gray and brown leather seats
Cruiser Collection logo
Deluxe Bench Seat logo
Pro-Series Seats logo
TMI logo
red truck driving and two black leather seats
Cruiser Collection logo
close up of black and brother leather seats
Deluxe Bench Seat logo
close up of gray and brown leather seats
Pro-Series Seats logo
CTP logo with red star Event
BY Fuelish Media
Lone Star
Throwdown 2024
A Texas Sized Event for the Masses
L

ike they say, everything is bigger in Texas and the annual Lone Star Throwdown (LST) never disappoints when it comes to size and quality of rides. This show has quite the reputation in the truck scene for bringing out the heavy hitters, even in the face of battling severe weather. However, this year, the sun was shining brightly the entire weekend of February 23-25 and it brought out the masses.

Held at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds in Conroe, we were completely shocked to see the turnout this year. Because so many people want to get in on the action, preregistration is limited to 2,000 vehicles. Though it is capped off, it still makes for one of the largest truck shows on the planet. Even the parking lot seemed like a show in itself, as it was flooded with trucks that couldn’t make it in.

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Thanks for reading our June 2024 preview issue!